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Posts for: February, 2010

Enjoy Pregnancy without Foot Pain
Physician offers mothers-to-be remedies for aching feet

 

"Oh my aching feet" is a phrase you hear often from pregnant women. But, are sore feet a symptom they just must deal with during pregnancy? According to Fort Lee, NJ, foot and ankle surgeon Greg Khaimov, DPM, AACFAS, the answer is "no." There are many remedies available to help alleviate foot pain.

Women often experience foot pain during pregnancy because of increased weight, foot instability and swelling. "In the last five years, I've seen an increase in pregnant women with foot pain because more women than ever before are active, even running marathons, during their pregnancies," Dr. Khaimov says. He recommends the following guidelines to help reduce foot pain during pregnancy.

Painful, Swollen Feet -- Pregnant women often experience throbbing, swollen feet due to excess fluid build up (edema) in the feet from the weight and position of the baby. To reduce swelling, put feet up whenever possible, stretch legs frequently, wear wide comfortable shoes and don't cross legs when sitting.

Arch Pain -- Pain in the arch can be due to both arch fatigue or over pronation (or the flattening of the arch). Over pronation causes extreme stress to the ligament (the plantar fascia) that holds up the arch of the foot. The best way to prevent arch pain is to stretch daily in the morning and before and after any exercise, don't go barefoot and wear supportive low-heeled shoes.

Ingrown Toenails -- Excessive stress from tightly-fitting shoes causes painful ingrown toenails. Give your feet a break: wear wider shoes during the last trimester of pregnancy to avoid ingrown toenails. If you do experience an ingrown toenail, avoid attempting "bathroom surgery." Repeated cutting of the nail can cause the condition to worsen over time. It is best to seek treatment with a foot and ankle surgeon.

It is also not uncommon for women to experience a change in their foot size during pregnancy. "A permanent growth in a women's foot, up to half a size, can occur from the release of the same hormone, relaxin, that allows the pelvis to open to deliver the baby. It makes the ligaments in your feet more flexible, causing feet to spread wider and longer," Dr. Khaimov adds.

Pregnancy and pending motherhood should be a joy. If foot pain persists, call our office at (201)363-9844. We can provide relief with conservative treatments such as physical therapy, foot orthotics, supportive shoes and minor toenail procedures.


This winter's fashionable high-heeled boots put women at risk for slips, falls, and injuries on ice and snow. These popular boots typically feature tall, spiked heels and narrow, pointed toes.

Wearing high-heels makes you more unstable when walking or standing on dry surfaces, let alone slippery ones like ice or snow. A stylish low-heeled winter boot is a lot more fashionable than a cast and crutches. Dr. Khaimov also recommends women scuff-up the soles of new boots, or purchase adhesive rubber soles, to provide greater traction.

Falls from high-heeled winter boots can lead to a number of injuries, depending on how the woman loses her balance. If her ankles roll inward or outward, she can break her ankles. If her ankle twists, ligaments can be stretched or torn, causing an ankle sprain. According to the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons consumer Web site, FootHealthFacts.org, broken and sprained ankles can be present at the same time. Dr. Khaimov is one of 6,000 ACFAS members.

This time of year we see a variety of broken bones occurring in patients who have slipped on the ice. These include broken toes, metatarsals, heels and ankles. Dr. Khaimov urges women hurt from slips and falls in high-heeled winter boots to contact his office at 201-363-9844 for prompt evaluation and treatment. In the meantime, immediately use the "R.I.C.E." method - rest, ice, compression and elevation - to help reduce swelling, pain and further injury.

"Delaying treatment can result in long-term complications such as chronic ankle instability and pain, arthritis, or deformity," says Dr. Greg Khaimov. "Even if you're able to walk on the injured foot, pain, swelling, or bruising indicates a serious injury."


By [email protected]ootandanklectr.com
February 15, 2010
Tags: Untagged

Whether you live in a cold-weather climate or you're just vacationing in one, the winter season can be beautiful but also very dangerous, with snowy, icy walkways. Using caution when outside or traveling to wintery areas can help prevent ankle sprains and fractures from ruining your plans for enjoying the winter months.

Wear the right shoes for the weather: High-heeled boots may be fashionable but not very practical on slippery surfaces. Shoes or boots with a low heel and traction soles provide a more secure footing. If you need to wear high-heeled shoes, change into them when you arrive at your destination.

Check for slippery areas: Watch your step when exiting your car or walking out of a building. Take notice of any potentially icy areas. Keep your hands free to support and help provide balance in case you begin to fall.

Keep areas near doorways well-lit and clear of ice and snow: Areas around your house, especially stairs and sidewalks, should be well lit so that you and your guests can better detect icy areas.

Don't ignore an injured foot or ankle: If you do suffer an injury, don't delay in calling our office for prompt evaluation and treatment. In the meantime, the R.I.C.E. method should be followed.
Rest: Stay off the injured (foot/ankle). Walking may cause further injury.
Ice: Apply an ice pack to the injured area, placing a thin towel between the ice and the skin. Use ice for 20 minutes and then wait at least 40 minutes before icing again.
Compression: An elastic wrap should be used to control swelling.
Elevation: The (foot/ankle) should be raised slightly above the level of your heart to reduce swelling.
Delaying treatment can result in long-term complications such as chronic ankle instability and pain, arthritis, or deformity. Remember, even if you are able to walk on the injured foot,
you may still have a serious injury.


February 12, 2010
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

Welcome to the Blog of Foot and Ankle Center of Fort Lee, LLC

Whether you are an existing patient or searching for a podiatrist in the Fort Lee area, we're excited you are here. With the podiatry industry advancing, we recognize the importance of keeping our patients and visitors up to date with all of the new and exciting things taking place in our practice.

As we move forward with our blog, we hope to promote podiatric awareness as a vital part of your healthy, active lifestyle.Here you will find a variety of articles and topics including the latest developments in podiatry, podiatric treatments and helpful foot care advice from Dr. Khaimov and his staff.

We hope you find our blog to be helpful, engaging and informational to ensure the long-term health of your feet.
As always, feel free to contact us with any questions or concerns.

-- The Foot and Ankle Center of Fort Lee, LLC Team




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